Monday, November 26, 2012

An EHR Fantasy

Now that I've been using my EHR for more than three months, the muscle memory has taken over but there are still only so many clicks I am capable of doing in any given moment. Locating the right forms to insert, deciding how many templates to download, determining if I should plug the microphone back in between patients or carry it from room to room, figuring out the most expeditious way to document in the problem list from a scanned referral note or lab results and finding new ways to record a note, these things are all going to take a lot of time. Yesterday I came across an interesting article by Marla Durben Hirsch from the FierceIT blog: EHR vendors propagating a myth about their products. Amusingly enough, the article made me daydream:
I am in a room with a patient, iPad in hand. With touchscreen input, I easily target any templated buttons with my finger (instead of missing it with the stylus because it's not quite in the 'sweet' spot). There is a graphical interface that's pleasant to the eye, usable and intuitive. Dictation feeds directly into the chart from an adequately programmed microphone IN the iPad, so I don't have to cart a separate piece of equipment with a ten-foot wire. There are separate modules for each specialist and a broader one for me, the family doc. If I misspell a word, there is a spell-checker (incredibly, something my present EHR is without). To show an illustration to a patient I simply double-click the home button and choose the browser for the internet or another app to illustrate a point. If there's a video I'd like a patient to see it's up in an instant. From the iPad I can quickly email links, videos or relevant information to the patient. It rarely crashes, the screen can be enlarged or reduced depending on my needs. It is smaller than a laptop and less obtrusive than paper charts. I add apps specific to my interests or my patients. And they don't cost an arm and a leg. 
Alas I come back to the real world where my stylus still has to be placed just slightly to the left of the circle I'm aiming at. When I suggest to my IT support that hiring gaming developers might be a great way to improve the interface of our present EHR I'm really not kidding. Seriously, making patient documentation something inherently usable would go far to improve the acceptance of them with physicians. Despite claims to the contrary, physicians LIKE tech. We just expect the tech to be user-friendly. More specifically, we expect EHRs to work like the apps on our phones and our tablets. What a joy to look at a screen like this:
From the app iBP by Leading Edge Apps LLC

But no, my screen is riddled with tiny mono-color dots and clickorrhea is the name of the game. 

While patient care is serious there is no reason why electronic documenting could not be a joy to use. As more digital natives enter medicine they will be more insistent that the software they use to take care of patients be as easy to use as the apps they use to monitor their heart rates with exercise, check in with Foursquare, or text their friends. From my perspective, they can't get here fast enough!

1 comment:

  1. Great post. I am writing a paper about EHR Vendors so I have been doing a lot of research, that is how I came across your post. Thanks so much for sharing Kathy, this was very interesting and helpful.